Above: Two photographs found amongst the personal papers and artifact left behind by Clifford T. Bell in the wake his
disappearance. Left - the iconic c. 1940 befezzed image of the ever smiling Clifford. This photograph is dated April 1940,
just a few short months before his tragic disappearance. It was taken at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles.
Right - a view of the California National Guard Armory in Exposition Park, Los Angeles. It was in the lower reaches of
this building that Clifford conducted his after-hours investigations into the powers of the Purple Fez and where the final
conflagration that led to his disappearance took place.
While his work in Hollywood had Clifford hobnobbing with the elite
of the film industry the intermittent nature of that same work
necessitated him finding more stable employment. Exactly how he
found himself at Exposition Park is not known but he none the less
was soon gainfully ensconced designing and maintaining exhibits at
the State Exposition building there. Based on entries in surviving
pages of this "Fez Diary" Clifford may to have chosen the job due to
its close proximity to the National Guard Amory building - there
seems to be some implication that he somehow knew of the tunnels
beneath the structure even before he began working at the park and
thought that this would offer him a perfect place and opportunities
to seriously delve into the mysteries of the Fez.
Above: During the 1930s the California State Exposition
Building was mainly concerned with showcasing the
products of the State's agricultural industries. This
snapshot shows Clifford at work creating displays of
preserved flowers and produce. This is the only known
photograph of Clifford at work. This photo is dated on
the reverse in Clifford's own hand 1938.

Photo: The Secret Archives of the Noble & Antediluvian
Order of the Brotherhood of the Purple Fez.
Above: Family reunion - July 1937. Although Clifford
made no comment about it - at least in the surviving
pages of his journal this photograph seems to indicate that
Clifford had made amends with his estranged family
sometime after his arrival in Los Angeles. Pictured left to
right - Clifford's grandfather Buford T. "Gettysburg"
Bell, one of Clifford's countless uncles  Beauregard T.
"the Boss" Bell, and Clifford himself. This photo was
taken in the Exposition Building's so-called "Redwood
Room" which showcased California's lumber industry.

Photo: The Secret Archives of the Noble & Antediluvian
Order of the Brotherhood of the Purple Fez.
What little is known about Clifford's actual investigations into,
and experimentations with the Purple Fez was found in the
previously mentioned surviving pages of his journal which
member's of the Brotherhood have dubbed his "Fez Diary".
Many of those surviving pages reflect Clifford's mundane tasks
during his days at work and offer little insight to the matters
being dealt with here. Other pages are in such a fragmentary and
damaged condition as to be virtually unreadable. Intermixed with
these in often in a rather random manner are whole pages
devoted to his efforts concerning the Fez. Some of these pages go
into remarkable detail while others only hint as to what Clifford
was up to at that moment or what thoughts were coursing
through his always active mind. Combined they paint a
tantalizingly fragmentary picture of his "goings on".
Right: Dated September 23 [1940] this page of Clifford diary outlines some
of his Fez related activities just a day before the tragic and still unsolved
events that befell him. In these writings we can also sense something of the
dread and foreboding that Clifford felt but seemed unable to avoid. This
page also mentions certain "spells" that he found inscribed on stone tablets
withing the maze-like halls of the Temple of the Ages. Did Clifford
transcribe these spells while at the Temple or did his carry some of those
tablets out of the desert with him? The later hardly seems likely for a man
lost in a parched wilderness with little water. If he did transcribe the tablets
then those treasured documents must have been lost with their creator since
no hint of them were or have ever been found.

Diary Page: The Secret Archives of the Noble & Antediluvian Order of the
Brotherhood of the Purple Fez.
Left: Dated September 24 [1940] here Clifford reminiscences
about his old friends in the Legion and ponders his impending -
and ultimately fateful - experimentations with the Purple Fez.  In
spite of all this his underlying good nature and sometimes
whimsical personality still comes through with his reference to a
planned lunch with Rita Hayworth and Gary Cooper which, as
the fates ordained, would never take place.

Diary Page: The Secret Archives of the Noble & Antediluvian
Order of the Brotherhood of the Purple Fez.
Right: Fun in the Sun. Apparently not
all was always serious with Clifford.
Here he is pictured sometime in the
1930s impressing the ladies at the beach
in Santa Monica, California.

On the reverse side of this tiny and
tattered photo Clifford noted in pencil:
"Sand, more sand. I never seem to get
very far from it!"

Photo: The Secret Archives of the Noble
& Antediluvian Order of the
Brotherhood of the Purple Fez.
Left: The seductive and radiant Rita Hayworth -
Hollywood star and mystery woman in the always
mysterious life of Clifford T. Bell. Interestingly this
prop ship's wheel w
ith which the lovely Rita poses
bears the ship's name - SS Venture. T
his is another of
those strange occurrences in Clifford's enigmatic life.

Photo: Columbia Pictures Archives.
Left: Clifford makes the cover. Clifford
appeared not once, but twice in the October
1939 edition of Popular Mechanics
magazine. The article described in detail the
work that Clifford did while employed as an
exhibit technician at the State Exposition
Building at Exposition Park.


O
riginal Magazine: The Secret Archives of
the Noble & Antediluvian Order of the
Brotherhood of the Purple Fez.